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Esmail Ahmadi-Moqaddam

(a.k.a.: Ismail Ahmadi Moghadam)

Title: Chief of Iran’s National Police Forces (Since 2006)

Sanctions: European Union (April 12, 2011) & United States (June 9, 2011)

In April 2011, the European Union named Ahmadi-Moqaddam as an individual subject to sanctions for human rights violations. The Official Journal of the European Union identified the Iranian police chief as responsible for “brutal attacks on peaceful protests, and a violent night time attack on the dormitories of Tehran University on June 15, 2009.”[1]

On June 9, 2011, the United States designated Ahmadi-Moqaddam for human rights abuses in the aftermath of the June 2009 elections, according to the U.S. Treasury.[2]

According to reports, Ahmadi-Moqaddam “thanked police forces for planning confrontations with demonstrators and cracking down on protests.” He publicly confirmed the arrests of 1,032 people; he also acknowledged monitoring the emails and text messages of citizens, violating their privacy.[3]

When a police car ran over a protester during the Ashura protests in December 2009, Ahmadi-Moqaddam refused to take responsibility and did not order an investigation into the incident, according to the International Campaign for Human Rights in Iran.[4]

According to The New York Times, prior to his appointment to head Iran’s national police force, Ahmadi-Moghadam was commander of the Basij in Tehran and a senior commander in the IRGC. [5]

 


[1]The Council of the European Union, “Council Regulation No 359/2011 of 12 April 2011 Concerning Restrictive Measures Directed Against Certain Persons, Entities and Bodies in View of the Situation in Iran,” Official Journal of the European Union, April 14, 2011.

[2]United States Department of the Treasury, Press Release, “Treasury Sanctions Iranian Security Forces for Human Rights Abuses,” June 9, 2011. (http://www.treasury.gov/press-center/press-releases/Pages/tg1204.aspx)

[3]“Official Distortion and Disinformation: A Guide to Iran’s Human Rights Crisis,” International Campaign for Human Rights in Iran, March 2011, p. 10. (http://www.iranhumanrights.org/2011/02/distortion-disinformation/)

[4]“Official Distortion and Disinformation: A Guide to Iran’s Human Rights Crisis,” International Campaign for Human Rights in Iran, March 2011, p. 11. (http://www.iranhumanrights.org/2011/02/distortion-disinformation/)

[5]Nazila Fathi, “Militia Chief Chosen to Lead Iranian Police,” The New York Times, July 11, 2005. (http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9B02E6D6153DF932A25754C0A9639C8B63)