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Ghorban-Ali Dorri-Nadjafabad

Title: Prosecutor General of Iran (until September 2009)

Sanctions: European Union (April 12, 2011)

In April 2011, the European Union included Ghorban-Ali Dorri-Nadjafabad among a number of individuals subject to sanctions for human rights violations. According to the Official Journal of the European Union, as Iran’s Prosecutor General between 2005 and 2009, Dorri-Nadjafabad presided over the first post-election show trials in which accused protestors were denied basic rights. He was also found responsible for the prisoner abuses that occurred at the Kahrizak detention center. [1]

Iran’s PressTV reports that Dorri-Nadjafabad admitted that in Kahrizak and other prisons, “interrogation techniques went too far.” [2] An investigation by the Majlis, Iran’s parliament, determined that three young men died as a result of the maltreatment while in custody at Kahrizak, reported the Iran Human Rights Documentation Center. [3]

In 2009, Dorri-Nadjafabad accused the Baha’i, a persecuted ethnic minority in Iran, of having strong and long-term relations with Zionists and “direct contact with the foreign enemies of Iran,” calling their organization “ghastly” and “illegal,” according to The Washington Post.[4]

The Official Journal of the European Union states that Dorri-Nadjafabad served as Iran’s intelligence minister during the Khatami presidency. [5] According to the Los Angeles Times, he was pressured resigning his post after several Iranian dissidents died at the hands of “renegade” intelligence agents in 1998.[6]


[1]Council of the European Union, “Council Regulation (EU) No 359/2011 of 12 April 2011 Concerning Restrictive Measures Directed Against Certain Persons, Entities, and Bodies in View of the Situation in Iran,” Official Journal of the European Union, April 12, 2011. p. 100/55.

[2]“Kahrizak Prison Chief Dismissed, Arrested,” PressTV (Iran), August 10, 2009. (http://www.payvand.com/news/09/aug/1084.html)

[3]“A Year Later: Suppression Continues in Iran,” Iran Human Rights Documentation Center, June 12, 2010. (http://www.iranhrdc.org/english/publications/reports/3162-a-year-later-suppression-continues-in-iran.html?p=28)

[4]Thomas Erdbrink, “Iran Accuses 7 Jailed Leaders of Bahai Faith of Espionage,” The Washington Post, February 18, 2009. (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/02/17/AR2009021703011.html)

[5]Council of the European Union, “Council Regulation (EU) No 359/2011 of 12 April 2011 Concerning Restrictive Measures Directed Against Certain Persons, Entities, and Bodies in View of the Situation in Iran,” Official Journal of the European Union, April 12, 2011. p. 100/55.

[6]John Daniszewski, “Iran’s Spy Chief Quits in Wake of Dissident’s Killings,” Los Angeles Times, February 10, 1999. (http://articles.latimes.com/1999/feb/10/news/mn-6780)