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Mohammad-Reza Naqdi

Title: Deputy Director of Intelligence, Commander of the Basij (Since October 2009), Quds Force of the Revolutionary Guards

Sanctions: United States (February 23, 2011) and European Union (April 12, 2011)

According to the European Union, Mohammad-Reza Naqdi was responsible human rights violations after the June 2009 elections and during the December 2009 Ashura day protests. [1]

According to an Iran Human Rights Documentation Center, Naqdi was born in Iraq, but following the 1979 Revolution moved to Iran, where he rose through the ranks of the IRGC. In 1993, he became deputy director for intelligence of the Quds Force, which is responsible for exporting the Islamic Revolution.[2]

The Iran Human Rights Documentation Center states that between 1997 and 1998. Naqdi was implicated in the incarceration and torture of the mayor of Tehran, Qolam-Hossein Karbaschi, along with other prominent city officials. He was also reportedly involved with the creation and financing of Ansar-i-Hezbollah, a militant group that participated in the 1999 attacks on students at Tehran University.[3]

Prior to Naqdi’s involvement with the Basij, he was the Deputy Chief of the Armed Forces General Staff for Logistics and Industrial Research and head of the State Anti-Smuggling Headquarters, according to Iran Watch.[4]

In 2002, Naqdi was arrested after becoming the leader of the Supreme Council’s intelligence arm, when authorities learned of his self-torture practices, according to The Majalla. He was released three months later on orders from the Revolutionary Guard.[5]

At the time of the June 2009 elections, Naqdi was head of the Basij intelligence unit. According to the Official Journal of European Union, this unit was responsible for “interrogating those arrested during the post-election crackdown.”[6]

Naqdi became head of the Basij in October 2009.

The European Union also held Naqdi responsible for the violent Basij response to the Ashura Day protests in December 2009, “which resulted in up to 15 deaths and the arrests of hundreds or protesters.”[7]


[1]Council of the European Union, “Council Regulation (EU) No 359/2011 of 12 April 2011 Concerning Restrictive Measures Directed Against Certain Persons, Entities, and Bodies in View of the Situation in Iran,” Official Journal of the European Union, April 12, 2011. p. 100/7.

[2]“A Year Later: Suppression Continues in Iran,” Iran Human Rights Documentation Center, March 2, 2011. (http://www.iranhrdc.org/english/publications/reports/3162-a-year-later-suppression-continues-in-iran.html?p=22)

[3]“A Year Later: Suppression Continues in Iran,” Iran Human Rights Documentation Center, March 2, 2011. (http://www.iranhrdc.org/english/publications/reports/3162-a-year-later-suppression-continues-in-iran.html?p=22)

[4]“Iranian Entity: Brigadier-General Mohammad Reza Naqdi,” Iran Watch, August 28, 2008. (http://www.iranwatch.org/suspect/records/mohammad-reza-naqdi.html)

[5]Najah Mohamed Ali, “The Commander of the Basij: Mohammad Reza Naqdi: The Tyrant of the Campus,” The Majalla, January 11, 2010. (http://www.majalla.com/en/profile/article13606.ece)

[6]Council of the European Union, “Council Regulation (EU) No 359/2011 of 12 April 2011 Concerning Restrictive Measures Directed Against Certain Persons, Entities, and Bodies in View of the Situation in Iran,” Official Journal of the European Union, April 12, 2011. p. 100/7.

[7]Council of the European Union, “Council Regulation (EU) No 359/2011 of 12 April 2011 Concerning Restrictive Measures Directed Against Certain Persons, Entities, and Bodies in View of the Situation in Iran,” Official Journal of the European Union, April 12, 2011. p. 100/7.